In Other News

person to person — impact: Common, yes, but a treasure still

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A Look Back in History: From Native Clay to Beautiful Roof tile Adorning our Most Primitive Homes

In the Colonial years, when handmade brick was scarce, the availability of native clay also afforded Valley pioneers to build attractive brick chimneys with courses of brick corbelling. The result: the entire Oley Township being honored as a National...

By Richard L.T. Orth|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Opinion

    Think about it: The Phenomenon of the Ring

    “Of all the passions, the passion of the Inner Ring is most skillful in making a man who is not yet a very bad man do very bad things.” — C.S. Lewis

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  • Opinion

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    Kampf will fight for us in Harribsurg

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  • Opinion

    The Historian: More about cabbage

    It’s safe to say that in bygone years everyone who had a little ground cultivated a vegetable garden. Not only country folk, but many town dwellers had a fenced back yard garden, often a chicken pen, and maybe even a pig or two.

    By Robert Wood|

  • Opinion

    welcome to my world: Pennsylvania’s ‘Greene Country’

    “Trees” by Joyce Kilmer “I think that I shall never see

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist|

  • Opinion

    Think about it: The cut flower culture

    “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”— Peter Drucker

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  • Opinion

    A Look Back in History: The Warmth and Charm in Georgian Architecture

    In a very attractive Georgian mansion, the stone mason will not just simply lay up the stone helter-skelter, but select large stones for the corners known as quoins. The 1808 Spang, 1805 Hunter, and 1815 Reiff mansions of the Oley Valley have fine quoins in their corners that make the structures imposing, as many others. Although most keystones, another feature if Georgian architecture, are in wood, there are a few mansions in the area with stone lintels and stone keystones. When...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Opinion

    Person to Person — Impact: Many tricks ... Few treats

    I have a reoccurring nightmare! The year was 1954 and my parents, my siblings and I were about to arrive in the small borough where we kids would see our new home for the first time. As we turned off the commercial highway in the spring, we were greeted by nice houses lining avenues and places, many of which were named after colleges. Large trees lined each side of the street, with their branches overhanging the streets, creating a canopy effect with their leaves, testifying to the age of...

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  • Columns

    Welcome to my World: Grave Epitaphs

    Every summer that I can remember as a kid, Mom insisted Pop drive to visit the gravesites of both the Christman’s, in Lehigh County, and the Kohler’s, in Berks County. Mom also took us on walks to the family cemetery of the Siegfried’s, from Siegfriedsdale, located near our farm. In the early days of rural America, families were allowed burial plots near their home.

    By Carole Christman Koch Columnist |

  • Columns

    A Look Back in History: Interesting Folk Days rooted in Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers (pun intended)

    Pennsylvania Dutch rural folklore was important in providing Rhineland peasants with knowledge of becoming successful American farmers. Although most PA Deitsch folklore revolved around their religion, it is dubious that Grundsau Day (Groundhog Day) was purely an American idea. Perhaps it was a wise trick of a minister or public citizens in wanting to make local peasants aware they should be checking their farm equipment for the current spring planting. This myth about the hibernating...

    By Richard L.T. Orth|

  • Columnists

    person to person — impact: Treasures Among Us (Part 2 of 2)

    Last week I shared with you about meeting Bill and Marge Montgomery in church, his early years in committing his live to Jesus Christ, his music accomplishments and attending the Navy Music School. The following is additional information I learned about Bill during our conversations.

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