Pope John Paul II athletic standout completes Eagle project for Blessed Teresa CYO

Kirk Cherneskie, on the field for Pope John Paull II this season.
Kirk Cherneskie in the storage space ay Blessed Teresa. Courtesy of John Cherneskie.

LIMERICK — Kirk Cherneskie is used to putting in time.

At Pope John Paul II High School, Cherneskie has been a star running back for the football team, 182-pound wrestler, representative to the student council and a “peer minister.”

But the most rewarding of the time Cherneskie has put in might be in his quest to become an Eagle Scout.

“(It’s) really important. It’s definitely something I’m really proud of,” Cherneskie told 21st Century Media. “It’s a huge accomplishment. It goes up there with any sport or any academic.”

Cherneskie recently completed the project prerequisite to attaining Eagle status. The project he chose involved cataloguing and creating organizational space for Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Roman Catholic’s CYO sports programs’ athletic equipment and uniforms.

“I played CYO there,” Cherneskie said. “I was involved, still involved with the church there. I knew they needed a place to put all their equipment and the storage facility there were using was not really working out.”

Cherneskie’s brother John built the softball field at Blessed Teresa about three years ago for his Eagle Project, so work at Blessed Teresa runs in the family.

Kirk enlisted the help of his father, also named John, and the CYO athletic director, Jim Nash, to “work out the details” for ordering a new storage shed, having it delivered and constructed.

On top of that, Cherneskie estimated that he did 100 hours worth of sifting through the various pieces of equipment and sports clothing to organize it all.

“Everything just took time,” he said.

As he sorted through, Cherneskie logged everything into a database.

During the sorting, Cherneskie found some things, especially in an old storage barn, that he probably rather didn’t find.

“There was a lot of old stuff. There was a lot of not good stuff,” he laughed. “I think we found a few dead birds in the old barn.”

Shelves had to be hand-constructed to hold the equipment and uniforms for at least seven different CYO sports.

Through the hard work, Cherneskie felt everything “just came together.”

With the facility finished and in-use for the spring sports, Cherneskie is able to reflect on his efforts.

“It’s one of my proudest moments,” he said.

Follow Frank Otto on Twitter @fottojourno.